Our people are extraordinary.

Arts & Sciences has over 1,000 faculty and staff who utilize their diverse expertise in the pursuit of research breakthroughs, gaining a deeper understanding of the world's most pressing issues and serving as mentors of the next generation.

select honors from our faculty

9 Elected Members of the National Academy of Sciences
Guggenheim Fellows in past 7 years
6 Nobel Laureates in Physics, Chemistry, Medicine and Economics

Recent Faculty Grants & Awards

Barbara Kunkel, a professor in the Department of Biology, has been awarded $645,000 from the National Science Foundation in support of research on "Roles of Auxin During Pseudomonas syringae Pathogenesis."

See what our faculty are working on now

More from The Ampersand
Wingfield

Three Questions with Adia Harvey Wingfield

Adia Harvey Wingfield, professor of sociology, studies the intersection of race, work and sociology. In addition to writing regularly about such matters for The Atlantic, she also has written numerous scholarly articles and books, including No More Invisible Man: Race and Gender in Men’s Work.

Faculty Spotlight: Swanne Gordon, Assistant Professor of Biology

Faculty Spotlight: Swanne Gordon, Assistant Professor of Biology

Swanne Gordon, assistant professor of biology, talks about her background, career challenges and passionate belief in embracing diversity and broadening horizons. "As a minority in STEM it is easy to feel that you don’t belong in academia because there are rarely people that look like you in positions of power in it, or really in any positions at all. The overt racism my father went through as a black scientist in North America in the 70’s has now given way to more covert racism (although my experiences show me the other definitely still exists); where people in academia (students and staff) devalue your merits, question your presence even in spite of your CV, limit your promotions, cite and collaborate with you less, etc. It is imperative that we fight against and fix these issues. The importance of this cannot be overstated because as I always say and wholeheartedly believe, only when the broad diversity of humanity is fairly represented, can science truly appeal to our society as a universal knowledge."

Welcome to WashU: Flora Cassen

Historian Flora Cassen specializes in European Jewish history, particularly in the Renaissance. For our series highlighting new faculty, Cassen shares some of her ongoing projects and her thoughts on the role of historical scholarship in discussions of modern-day antisemitism.