Adia Harvey Wingfield

Adia Harvey Wingfield

​Associate Dean for Faculty Development
Professor of Sociology
PhD, Johns Hopkins University

contact info:

mailing address:

  • Washington University
    CB 1112
    One Brookings Drive
    St. Louis, MO 63130-4899

​Professor Wingfield specializes in research that examines the ways intersections of race, gender, and class affect social processes at work.

Adia Harvey Wingfield is Professor of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research examines how and why racial and gender inequality persists in professional occupations. Dr. Wingfield has lectured internationally on her research in this area, and her work has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals including Social Problems, Gender & Society, and American Behavioral Scientist. She is currently President-elect of the Southern Sociological Society, one of the largest regional sociological associations in the country, and is a regular contributor to Slate, The Atlantic, and Harvard Business Review. Professor Wingfield is the author of several books, most recently Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy, and is the recipient of the 2018 Public Understanding of Sociology award from the American Sociological Association.

Media

From our podcast:

Hold That Thought Podcast

Inequality at Work

Sociologist Adia Harvey Wingfield documents the subtle and pervasive ways that black men continue to face inequality in the workplace.

Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

What happens to black health care professionals in the new economy, where work is insecure and organizational resources are scarce? In Flatlining, Adia Harvey Wingfield exposes how hospitals, clinics, and other institutions participate in “racial outsourcing,” relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians, and physician assistants to do “equity work”—extra labor that makes organizations and their services more accessible to communities of color. Wingfield argues that as these organizations become more profit driven, they come to depend on black health care professionals to perform equity work to serve increasingly diverse constituencies. Yet black workers often do this labor without recognition, compensation, or support. Operating at the intersection of work, race, gender, and class, Wingfield makes plain the challenges that black employees must overcome and reveals the complicated issues of inequality in today’s workplaces and communities.