Law & Society

A First-Year Ampersand Program

Law & Society 

This course considers the basic aspects of the American legal system: its foundations, processes, institutions and rights. The course also enables students to better understand and assess current legal events and encourages students to develop an interest in those events. Further, this course should enable students to consider law as a future area of study and career. Interested participants may continue their study in the spring semester with a three-credit seminar focusing on contemporary Supreme Court cases.

How to Apply

The application process for first-year programs and seminars opens on Tuesday, May 14, at noon (CT) and closes on Friday, May 17, at noon (CT). You will need your WUSTL Key to apply, so please be sure to sign up for your WUSTL Key by Monday, May 13 to give it 24 hours to activate. There will be a link to the application webform on the First-Year Programs homepage during this time for you to sign up. A statement of interest is required when you submit your application online.

First-Year Program Homepage

Our Courses

Fall 

Law and Society (L61 1261) 

This course considers the basic aspects of the American legal system: its foundations, processes, institutions and rights. We will also study some specific substantive areas of the law. The course consists of two 1-1/2 hour Socratic lectures per week. Upon completion of this course, you should have a basic knowledge of the American legal system, an important part of a general education. My hope is that such knowledge will enable you to better understand and assess current legal events. I also hope that you, if you have not already done so, develop an interest in those events. Further, this course should enable you to consider law as a future area of study and career. Interested students may continue their study in the spring semester with an optional one-credit seminar focusing on contemporary Supreme Court cases.

Spring

First-Year Law and Society (L61 1262) 

This three-credit course will be a continuation of the Freshman Seminar Law and Society. The course will apply knowledge learned in the first semester to analyze current and recent Supreme Course cases.