Clare Bokulich

Clare Bokulich

​Assistant Professor of Musicology
research interests:
  • Late-Medieval and Early Renaissance Music
  • Genre and Genre Theory
  • Silence

contact info:

mailing address:

  • Washington University
    CB 1032
    One Brookings Drive
    St. Louis, MO 63130-4899

​Clare Bokulich’s research focuses on the interconnectivity of music genres in the fifteenth century, particularly the ways in which musicians systematically crossed generic boundaries.

Clare Bokulich’s research focuses on the interconnectivity of music genres in the fifteenth century, particularly the ways in which musicians systematically crossed generic boundaries by quoting secular songs in masses, subsuming liturgical chant into the context of forme fixe chansons, and organizing motets into substitute mass cycles. Her work interrogates contemporary discussions of genre and genre hierarchy in addition to engaging with modern genre theory and historiography. 

She is also interested in the expressive potential of silence and has presented work on the use of silence in Miles Davis’s canonic album Kind of Blue and the intersection of silence and non-musical articulations in Wagner’s Parsifal.

Clare is the recipient of a Whiting Foundation Dissertation Completion Fellowship and the Lieberman Fellowship at Stanford University, where she also received the University’s Centennial Teaching Award and the Chair’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. 

Publications

“Meter and the Motetti Missales,” in Motet Cycles between Devotion and Liturgy, ed. Daniele V. Filippi and Agnese Pavanello (Basel, Switzerland: Schwabe, 2018).

"Contextualizing Josquin's Ave Maria...virgo serenaJournal of Musicology 34 (2017).

Review of The Cultural Life of the Early Polyphonic Mass: Medieval Context to Modern Revival by Andrew Kirkman, The Journal of Ecclesiastical History 63 (2012): 611-613. 

Awards

2018 Roland Jackson Award from the American Musicological Society for "Contextualizing Josquin's Ave Maria...virgo serena" (Journal of Musicology, 2017)