Performing Gold: Fanny Kemble, Modern Banking, and the Evolution of Acting

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<p>When actress Fanny Kemble took the stage in 1831 as Bianca, the pure and mistreated wife in Henry Milman&#39;s play&nbsp;<em>Fazio,&nbsp;</em>she astounded audiences with her true-to-life portrayal of jealousy and grief.&nbsp;<a href="https://pad.artsci.wustl.edu/julia-walker" target="_blank">Julia Walker</a>, associate professor of drama and English, brings the performance to life and explains why it was so extraordinary. Walker connects Kemble&#39;s acting style to historical&nbsp;events and anxieties, especially changing ideas about money and banking.&nbsp;</p><hr /><p>&nbsp;</p>

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