William Tate

William F. Tate

​Dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Vice Provost for Graduate Education, Professor of Education and of African and African-American Studies
Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences

contact info:

mailing address:

  • WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
  • CB 1183
  • ONE BROOKINGS DR.
  • ST. LOUIS, MO 63130-4899

As dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, William F. Tate awards all the master of arts and doctor of philosophy degrees at Washington University. The dean also works closely with the Olin Business School, the School of Engineering & Applied Science, the School of Medicine and the Brown School in supervising doctoral students in these schools’ PhD programs.

Professor Tate holds or has held other Arts & Sciences academic and research appointments including in African and African American Studies, American Culture Studies, Center for Applied Statistics and Computation, and Urban Studies.

He has authored scores of scholarly journal articles, book chapters, edited volumes, monographs, and textbooks focused on (1) social determinants of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology attainment; (2) epidemiological models and geospatial applications with a focus on adolescent and child developmental outcomes; and (3) social development of youth in the context of urban communities.

For more information, visit William Tate's department profile.

Research on Schools, Neighborhoods and Communities: Toward Civic Responsibility

Research on Schools, Neighborhoods and Communities: Toward Civic Responsibility

Research on Schools, Neighborhoods, and Communities: Toward Civic Responsibility focuses on research and theoretical developments related to the role of geography in education, human development, and health. William F. Tate IV, the Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and former President of the American Educational Research Association, presents a collection of chapters from across disciplines to further understand the strengths of and problems in our communities. Today, many research literatures—e.g., health, housing, transportation, and education—focus on civic progress, yet rarely are there efforts to interrelate these literatures to better understand urgent problems and promising possibilities in education, wherein social context is central. In this volume, social context—in particular, the unequal opportunities that result from geography—is integral to the arguments, analyses, and case studies presented. Written by more than 40 educational scholars from top universities across the nation, the research presented in this volume provides historical, moral, and scientifically based arguments with the potential to inform understandings of civic problems associated with education, youth, and families, and to guide the actions of responsible citizens and institutions dedicated to advancing the public good.