Marin Hynes

Mairin Hynes

​Senior Lecturer in Physics
PhD, Washington University
research interests:
  • Astrophysics
  • Extraterrestrial Materials
  • Presolar Grains

contact info:

mailing address:

  • WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
  • CB 1105
  • ONE BROOKINGS DR.
  • ST. LOUIS, MO 63130-4899

​Kathryn (Mairin) Hynes teaches introductory physics and general physics. Her research interests include the isotopic, structural, and chemical analysis of presolar grains.

For more information, visit Mairin Hynes' department profile.

Recent Courses

General Physics (Physics 211)

Designed for prospective majors in science and engineering and students planning to enter professional schools. Topics include kinematics, Newton's laws, energy, linear momentum, angular momentum, the conservation laws, gravitational force, harmonic motion, wave motion and interference, sound, and special relativity. Weekly laboratory sessions; no labs meet the first week of class. This course is restricted to students admitted to the Post-Baccalaureate Premedical program. Others may register with instructor permission, and on a space available basis.

    Physics I (Physics 197)

    Calculus-based introduction to the central concepts, laws, and structure of physics, presented in an active learning environment. The course is structured around three themes that are treated in depth: conservation laws, Newtonian physics, and special relativity. A daily regimen of homework and reading, as well as weekly homework assignments, small group problem-solving exercises, and active class participation are integral parts of this course.

      Physics II (Physics 198)

      Continuation of Physics 197. An advanced, calculus-based introduction to central concepts in modern physics in an active learning environment for students who desire to major in physics or another physical science, or who have a special interest in physics. The course is structured around three themes that are treated in depth: electricity and magnetism, quantum physics, and statistical and thermal physics. A daily regimen of homework and reading as well as active class participation are integral parts of the course.